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President Biden tours ravaged Louisville, Superior and Boulder County in wake of Marshall fire

President and First Lady leave Denver

6:42 p.m.

The president and the first lady get back on board Air Force One, bound for Las Vegas, where they will attend the funeral of Sen. Harry Reid. All told, the president spent about 4.5 hours in Colorado.

Air Force One turns onto the runway. Visit over -30- pic.twitter.com/1VzOo8QIxp

— Joe Rubino (@RubinoJC) January 8, 2022

6:19 p.m.

Marine One, carrying President Biden and First Lady Jill Biden, lands in darkness at DIA. The president spent a few hours in Louisville, touring neighborhoods destroyed by the Marshall fire and then meeting with families to console them for their loss.

Marine One comes in for a night landing at DIA. pic.twitter.com/gKXu5Csk93

— Joe Rubino (@RubinoJC) January 8, 2022

Bidens meet with families at the Louisville Recreation and Senior Center

5:34 p.m.

President Biden finishes up comments and leaves the Louisville Recreation Center to applause from those in the room. He tells folks to “stay strong.” His motorcade will head back to Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport, where Marine One will take him and his wife to where Air Force One awaits him at DIA.

5:30 p.m.

First Lady Jill Biden talks about pets that were taken by the Marshall fire. She ends her brief comments by saying: “Take care of one another.”

Now @FLOTUS speaking, thanks first responders, commends the community. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/XH4FOH6SNU

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 8, 2022

5:25 p.m.

President Biden says to everyone affected that “we’re here with you and we’re not going away.” He says he intends to do whatever it takes as long as it takes, working with local governments, to help victims rebuild. That includes cleaning up debris, getting help with insurance to rebuild, he said.

“We can’t ignore the reality that these fires are being supercharged. They’re being supercharged by changing weather,” Biden said.

He thanks Gov. Polis, Colorado’s congressional delegation for their work. pic.twitter.com/Jhh9KlYQSJ

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 8, 2022

5:19 p.m.

President Joe Biden is addressing the victims of the Marshall fire at the Louisville Recreation and Senior Center. The president was meeting privately with families at the center in the last hour. Colorado dignitaries are lined up behind the president.

President Joe Biden now speaking. Says it’s amazing to see the courage of the first responders, families. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/BciW4DwdTI

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 8, 2022

5:07 p.m.

The president is expected to deliver public remarks about the Marshall fire in Louisville in a matter of minutes. Sadly, the president’s visit to Colorado came on the same day the Boulder County coroner identified 69-year-old Robert Sharpe as the person whose partial remains were discovered this week during a search for two people missing and feared dead from the fire.

.@POTUS and @FLOTUS are continuing to meet with families at the rec center before upcoming remarks. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/n6BcATRPwK

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 8, 2022

4:36 p.m.

President Biden is likely meeting privately with families at the Louisville Recreation and Senior Center who lost their houses to the Marshall fire. Our reporter on the ground says the president is expected to make public remarks after that.

I’m grateful for @POTUS’s visit to Colorado today.

In the wake of disasters like the #MarshallFire, Coloradans are always resilient. With the support of the federal government and everyone working together, I know we will build back stronger than before. https://t.co/wXErydGoYD

— Michael Bennet (@SenatorBennet) January 7, 2022

4:19 p.m.

President Biden expected momentarily at the Louisville Recreation and Senior Center to deliver remarks about what he saw in the Harper Lake neighborhood, where dozens of homes were torched by the Marshall fire eight days ago.

I somehow broke the prior thread, but we are now inside the rec center, waiting for the president. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/hVP3fq4TIH

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

President and First Lady arrive in Louisville

4:03 p.m.

After spending around 40 minutes in Louisville’s Harper Lake neighborhood, the president is likely headed to the Louisville Recreation & Senior Center to meet with families who lost homes in the Marshall fire and to possibly deliver public remarks.

The damage is still so surreal to see up close. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/CPmgsNoC4l

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

Latest story: Coroner IDs 69-year-old Boulder County resident whose remains were found after Marshall fire

3:45 p.m.

The president shakes hands with Louisville firefighters and first responders. thanking them for the exhausting work they put in fighting the Marshall fire on Dec. 30 and in the days that followed.

.@POTUS and @FLOTUS meeting with Louisville firefighters.#MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/1JDEaU0Mqz

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

3:40 p.m.

Colorado political firepower gathers around President Biden and First Lady Jill Biden on Arapahoe Court in Louisville as the president tours Marshall fire damage and speaks to families who no longer have a home.

Meeting more people but we’re not close enough to hear. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/4ZCM2eMUUA

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

3:29 p.m.

President Biden gives a woman a long hug as he tours the Harper Lake neighborhood in Louisville. More than 500 homes were lost in Louisville from the Dec. 30 Marshall fire, and Harper Lake was one of the hardest hit parts of the city.

.@POTUS and @FLOTUS meeting more families in Harper Lake. #MarshallFire pic.twitter.com/KUTwJwwWEB

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

3:24 p.m.

The Bidens are on the street in the Harper Lake area of Louisville speaking to families who lost homes to the Marshall fire. All around the president and his wife are the charred remains of what used to be dozens of homes in this city east of Boulder.

Biden is talking to families who lost homes in the #marshallfire, firefighters. pic.twitter.com/3ZQrkfb3Hz

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

3:20 p.m.

President Biden and First Lady Jill Biden, along with some of Colorado’s congressional delegation, are now on the ground in Louisville. The president is speaking to Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle and other local officials.

.@POTUS has arrived. Also here @RepJoeNeguse, @GovofCO, @SenatorHick. #marshallfire pic.twitter.com/1ePcBXnt3k

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

The Bidens land at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport aboard Marine One

All Denver Post coverage of the Marshall fire

3:08 p.m.

The president and the first lady are expected in Louisville shortly. They will tour the damage from the Marshall fire and then the president is expected to deliver some remarks at the Louisville Recreation Center.

About 10 minutes before @POTUS and @FLOTUS arrive to Harper Lake where the #MarshallFire destroyed so many homes. pic.twitter.com/fFEO2eoRds

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

2:53 p.m.

Pool video shows President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden landing at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Broomfield aboard Marine One. They are scheduled to head to Louisville by ground.

The president is expected to head to a neighborhood near Harper Lake in Louisville that was completely destroyed by the Marshall fire eight days ago.

At the Harper Lake neighborhood, waiting for President Joe Biden’s arrival. I know it’s been said repeatedly, but it’s still a shock to see how the fire moves even in just one neighborhood. pic.twitter.com/x1Xto3EI84

— Saja Hindi (@BySajaHindi) January 7, 2022

President Biden lands at DIA

2:35 p.m.

The Bidens have boarded Marine One for the short flight to Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Broomfield. There is some question as to whether they will do an aerial tour of the Marshall fire area before heading to Louisville and Superior by ground transport.

The first couple and I believe Polis boarded Marine 1. Kinda lost the gov in the scrum. pic.twitter.com/4jJXqU3u3c

— Joe Rubino (@RubinoJC) January 7, 2022

2:23 p.m.

President Biden and Jill Biden have disembarked Air Force One, greeted by a large contingent of the state’s Democratic congressional delegation, including Sen. Michael Bennet, Sen. John Hickenlooper, Rep. Jason Crow, and Rep. Joe Neguse. Gov. Jared Polis and Lt. Gov. Dianne Primavera also greeted the Bidens. Now they will board the Marine One helicopter to fly to Broomfield.

.@potus and @FLOTUS descend the stairs. pic.twitter.com/0SHThMz4ua

— Joe Rubino (@RubinoJC) January 7, 2022

2:12 p.m.

President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden are on the ground at DIA. They are expected to board Marine One and make their way to Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Broomfield, before heading to Louisville.

The @POTUS is on the ground in Denver. For now. #marshallfire pic.twitter.com/hUllyrnY22

— Joe Rubino (@RubinoJC) January 7, 2022

2:03 p.m.

President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden are expected to land at Denver International Aiport at any moment. Marine One and a quartet of Ospreys are awaiting the president and his contingent on the tarmac. Security is tight and coronavirus measures are already being put in place.

The governor of Colorado, Jared Polis, is at DIA to greet the president, who will soon be headed northwest to Boulder County to survey damage from the Dec. 30 Marshall fire.

I’m at DIA awaiting the arrival of @POTUS. Marine 1 and a quartet of Ospreys waiting. President Biden and First Lady Jill Biden expected to land around 2 pm, I’m told. They will be touring the Marshall fire burn area. pic.twitter.com/WeiOR3KjoD

— Joe Rubino (@RubinoJC) January 7, 2022


President Joe Biden will arrive in Colorado Friday to see for himself the devastating impact of the Marshall fire on hundreds of families in Superior, Louisville and unincorporated Boulder County. The blaze, whipped eastward across a bone-dry landscape by relentless hurricane-force winds for hours on Dec. 30, destroyed 1,084 homes and damaged another 149 in what is now seen as the state’s most destructive wildlife.

The fast-moving fire forced 30,000 people to evacuate, and officials found human remains while searching for two people still missing. It destroyed entire neighborhoods in Louisville and Superior as winds pushed flames from one home to the next, overwhelming firefighters’ best efforts to get an upper hand on the blaze.